660 Krishnamurti, the self and self-improvement




Following yesterday’s blog, I find this in my inbox today. Krishnamurti talks about the self as regards self-improvement and its consequences ... this is a strong message to those who question their position in society; indeed, who question: 


“…the implications of a society which is based on acquisitiveness, on envy, on comparison, competition.” 


Freedom from the Known  advocates we discard all conditioning, because ...


"... only those who are capable of breaking away from all conditioning can discover that which is not measurable by the mind." 


This is not easy reading … what does it mean for those who do not easily fit in with the demands society confronts us with, such as consumption, ownership of assets, success and competitiveness? Everybody will have to find their own answer …







Conditioning of self-improvement



"The religions that we have do not help us to understand that which is the real because they are essentially based, not on the abandonment of the self, but on the improvement, the refinement of the self, which is the continuity of the self in different forms. It is only the very few who break away from society, not the outward trappings of society, but from all the implications of a society which is based on acquisitiveness, on envy, on comparison, competition. 


"This society conditions the mind to a particular pattern of thought, the pattern of self-improvement, self-adjustment, self-sacrifice, and only those who are capable of breaking away from all conditioning can discover that which is not measurable by the mind. 

 

"So, everywhere society is conditioning the individual, and this conditioning takes the form of self-improvement, which is really the perpetuation of the 'me', the ego, in different forms. Self-improvement may be gross or it may be very, very refined when it becomes the practice of virtue, goodness, the so-called love of one's neighbor, but essentially it is the continuance of the 'me', which is a product of the conditioning influences of society. 


"All your endeavor has gone into becoming something, either here, if you can make it, or if not, in another world; but it is the same urge, the same drive to maintain and continue the self."

 

Krishnamurti, Collected Works, Vol. IX", 83, Individual and Society                          


 











 

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